A Discussion of Video On Demand

Media Law Prof Blog

Why VOD (Video On Demand) is problematic for broadcasters. How can they structure it in order to satisfy viewers, yet not lose money

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The New VOD Deal: What Movie Theater Owners Think

Media Law Prof Blog

The Hollywood Reporter discusses movie theater owners' reaction to the studios' proposed VOD (video on demand) deal with DirecTV here

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Fox Appeals Dish Network Decision; Asks for Restraining Order Against AutoHop Service

THR, Esq. Entertainment & Media Law Blog

Fox Broadcasting and sister companies argue that service threatens their business by creating a "bootleg" form of video-on-demand. read more. THR, Esq. Television Fox Broadcasting Corporation Dish Network

Opposition To DirecTV VOD Service Increases

Media Law Prof Blog

A number of directors are stating their opposition to the new VOD (video on demand) service to be offered by DirecTV. Among them: James Cameron, who notes that many theater owners feel the economic pressure from such a service, which

Of “Lunch Stands and Merry-Go-Rounds”: Ninth Circuit’s Rejection of FTC Authority Over “Throttling” Could Have Far Reaching Implications for Cable and Other Broadband Providers

New Media and Technology Law

On August 29th, a Ninth Circuit panel unanimously held that the FTC has no power to challenge “throttling” of unlimited data plan customers by mobile broadband providers as an “unfair or deceptive act.” Critically, the panel found that the “common carrier” exception to section 5 applies based on the status of the entity as a regulated common carrier, not whether the particular activities at issue are regulated common carrier services.

CROWD RELEASE

Entertainment Law Resources Blog

When producers shoot a scene at a place open to the public people in the background might be captured on camera. Consequently, producers may post a sign at the entrances to the event alerting participants that they may be captured on screen and stating that by entering the venue they are consenting to be recorded. Alternatively, a release might be presented to persons when they purchase a ticket to an event and printed on the ticket as well.

FCC Proposes Expansion of Requirements for TV Stations and MVPDs to Provide Audio Description of Video Programming

Broadcast Law Blog

Last week was a busy one for the FCC, with decisions or proposals on a number of issues that can affect broadcasters, including changes to the EAS rules and proposals for the expansion of video description – the requirements that TV stations carry a certain amount of programming that is accompanied by audio descriptions to explain the visual action to TV station viewers who are blind or otherwise visually impaired.

Supreme Court to Review Challenge to Copyright Term Extension Act

Entertainment Law Resources Blog

September 30, 2002 Supreme Court to Review Challenge to Copyright Term Extension Act On October 9, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments that will determine the constitutionality of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. Petitioners in the Supreme Court case are challenging the Act, calling it an unconstitutional exercise of congressional power that violates the First Amendment and unduly burdens those who seek to create new works based on old ones. For more on Eldred v.

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Supreme Court to Review Challenge to Copyright Term Extension Act

Entertainment Law Resources Blog

September 30, 2002 Supreme Court to Review Challenge to Copyright Term Extension Act On October 9, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments that will determine the constitutionality of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. Petitioners in the Supreme Court case are challenging the Act, calling it an unconstitutional exercise of congressional power that violates the First Amendment and unduly burdens those who seek to create new works based on old ones. For more on Eldred v.

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Studios Lose a Round on Selectable Output Control; So Do Consumers

Copyrights & Campaigns

Here's the background: the studios want to introduce a new video-on-demand service where they would stream hi-def movies to consumers' homes, even before the DVD release. As the opposition we joined puts it, "Granting the waiver would put MPAA member companies on the path to controlling what types of connections will be used by all U.S. But the copyleft/consumer groups' position on SOC actually harms consumers rather than helps them.

"Citizens United": The Supreme Court Decision One Year Later

Broadcast Law Blog

Citizens United was a nonprofit corporation that produced the film, and there was debate whether this was a "documentary" or an "electioneering communication," as well as whether distribution via video on demand constituted "public distribution" of the film. Thus, Citizens United ran smack up against the FEC prohibition on independent corporate political expenditures. The Supreme Court issued its landmark opinion in Citizens United v.

DOMESTIC DISTRIBUTION PART I

Entertainment Law Resources Blog

Simply because certain television channels have satellite footprints that cover these areas, and licensors demand these rights be included in any deal. DVDs) for sale to mass merchants and video rental outlets. Some book films into theaters and then assign television and home video rights to third parties for licensing in those media. Others are basically home video labels that manufacture and market DVD's. One type of home video deal is known as a sub-label deal.

More Poobahisms from the Pukka Sahib

Music Technology Policy

To give you an idea of how Fred views the creative class, he told me once doing his best “let them eat cake” impression, “Well, artists will just have to learn to get along on less money” given the crippling losses in the music business. (I It seems that the important thing for Fred is that artists must lose economic rights and tech companies must be able to free ride on their work. Why would anyone ever pay for video on demand on YouTube?

DOMESTIC DISTRIBUTION PART II

Entertainment Law Resources Blog

If a domestic distributor is willing to take the plunge and release a film theatrically, it will almost always insist on securing ancillary rights for home video and television media. Thus, a major studio releasing a film on 4,000 screens will spend $6 million dollars. On top of that, the price of a single full page advertisement in the New York Times can add another hundred thousand dollars. In a few years, it may be difficult to view a movie on celluloid.

LAFF: Keynoter Stern Lays Out Indie Landscape

Thompson On Hollywood

Stern Chairman & CEO, Endgame Entertainment As Prepared for Delivery to the Los Angeles Film Festival June 20, 2009 I know some of you were expecting Mark Gill to be back today and deliver a follow-up to last year’s speech, but unfortunately, on the way over, Mark was struck by a piece of falling sky. They invented it – and then wisely moved on to more sensible things, like inventing medical forceps. Now I’ve basically one-upped Mark on pessimism. And so on.