Sat.Aug 24, 2019 - Fri.Aug 30, 2019

Dark Horses, Study Guides & Supertitles

Gordon P. Firemark

The Latest episode of my Entertainment Law podcast, Entertainment Law Update, is now available for your enjoyment. Listen here, or subscribe and download in your favorite podcast listening app. Show notes are located at www.entertainmentlawupdate.com/112. Here's what we talked about. KATY PERRY LOSES DARK HORSE CASE . Gigi Hadid beats Instagram copyright lawsuit . Narkiewicz-Laine v. Doyle (Stored Artwork destroyed by landlord) . KAUFFMAN V.

@musictechpolicy Podcast: Eight Mile Style Sues Spotify Under Music Modernization Act

Music Technology Policy

Chris Castle discussion of Eight Mile Style lawsuit against Spotify under Music Modernization Act (driving with dogs series). Eight Mile Style v. Spotify Complaint. MTP Podcasts Music Modernization Act Uncategorized Eight Mile Style litigation Reachback Safe Harbor

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Trending Sources

Goldman on The U.K. Online Harms White Paper and the Internet's Cable-ized Future @santaclaralaw @ericgoldman

Media Law Prof Blog

Eric Goldman, Santa Clara University School of Law, is publishing The U.K. Online Harms White Paper and the Internet’s Cable-ized Future in the Ohio State Tech L.J. Here is the abstract. In April 2019, the U.K. released a white paper

Cable 68

Utah Supreme Court Votes to Approve Pilot Allowing Non-Traditional Legal Services

Media Law

The Utah Supreme Court voted unanimously yesterday to approve the recommendations of a work group that called for “profoundly reimagining the way legal services are regulated in order to harness the power of entrepreneurship, capital, and machine learning in the legal arena.”.

Trump administration changing citizenship rules for some children of US.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

52

The Time to Hesitate is Through: Amazon’s Thievery Requires Decisive Action

Music Technology Policy

Emmanuel Legrand reports in his excellent newsletter that: Music industry trade group the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has asked the US government for tougher measures against infringers, in particular in the online marketplace.

Can Public Officials Block Critics on Their Social Media Accounts?

Media Law Prof Blog

First Amendment Watch surveys the legal landscape: Can Elected Officials Block Critics On Their Social Media Pages? Some cases of interest: Knight First Amendment Institute v. Trump The Bonnen lawsuit (Texas) Davison v. Loudoun County Board of Supervisors More discussion

More Trending

EPA's rollback of methane regulation is bad for the climate — and energy companies

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"On december 19 of last year, Admiral Michael Mullen, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, met James Mattis for lunch at the Pentagon.

Artist Glossary of Industry Terms: Re-Recording Restrictions

Music Technology Policy

If you’ve been following the Taylor Swift situation with her former label, you’ve probably seen the unsurprising news that Taylor plans to re-record some or all of her prior catalog. This raises the issue of the customary “re-recording restriction” and “re-producing restriction” found in artist and producer agreements respectively.

Abraham and White on First Amendment Imperialism and the Constitutionalization of Tort Liability @UVALaw

Media Law Prof Blog

Kenneth S. Abraham and G. Edward White, both of the University of Virginia School of Law, are publishing First Amendment Imperialism and the Constitutionalization of Tort Liability in the Texas Law Review. Here is the abstract. To what extent does

Utah Task Force Calls for ‘Profoundly Reimagining the Way Legal Services Are Regulated’

Media Law

Faced with an ever-widening gap in access to legal services, a Utah task force has called for “profoundly reimagining the way legal services are regulated in order to harness the power of entrepreneurship, capital, and machine learning in the legal arena.”

The Trump Administration Is Now Deporting Kids With Cancer | Vanity Fair ?? ?? ??

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

The Trump Administration Is Now Deporting Kids With Cancer | Vanity Fair

52

Ninth Circuit Releases Another Important CDA Section 230 Opinion With Broad Application – Automated Content Recommendation and Notification Tools Do Not Make Social Site the Developer of User Posts

New Media and Technology Law

In the swirl of scrutiny surrounding the big Silicon Valley tech companies and with some in Congress declaiming that Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA) should be curtailed , 2019 has quietly been an important year for CDA jurisprudence with a number of opinions enunciating robust immunity under CDA Section 230.

Betus, Kearns, and Lemieux on "Terrorism" or "Mental Illness"?: Factors That Impact How Media Label Terrorist Attacks @AllisonBetus @KearnsErinM @aflemieux

Media Law Prof Blog

Allison Betus, Georgia State University, Erin Kearns, University of Alabama, and Anthony Lemieux, Georgia State University, Global Studies Institute, have published 'Terrorism' or 'Mental Illness'?: Factors that Impact How Media Label Terrorist Attacks. Here is the abstract. Why do media

52

For the 50th LawNext, We Talk Podcasting with Legal Talk Network’s Adam Camras and Laurence Colletti

Media Law

It’s our 50th episode of LawNext, so we could think of no more appropriate topic than the state of podcasting in the legal industry. And we could think of no two guests better suited to the topic than Adam Camras , CEO of the Legal Talk Network , and Laurence Colletti , its executive producer. Camras is a longtime entrepreneur in the legal industry whose company Lawgical acquired the Legal Talk Network in 2013.

Trump campaign attacks AOC, Democrats: 'This is our country, not theirs'. Trump has clearly defined himself as our enemy. We must treat him as such.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Trump campaign attacks AOC, Democrats: 'This is our country, not theirs

52

Menell, Balganesh, and Nimmer on Mashups and Fair Use: The Bold Misadventures of the Seussian Starship Enterprise @BerkeleyLawBCLT

Media Law Prof Blog

Peter S. Menell, UC Berkeley School of Law, Shyamkrishna Balganesh, University of Pennsylvania Law School, and David Nimmer, Irell & Manell, LLP, have published Mashups and Fair Use: The Bold Misadventures of the Seussian Starship Enterprise. Here is the abstract

Friday Roundup: Post-ILTACON Legal Tech Awards Edition

Media Law

Two sets of legal technology awards were announced during the recent ILTACON, the annual conference of the International Legal Technology Association — ILTA’s own Distinguished Peer Awards and The Changing Lawyer Awards sponsored by Litera Microsystems. Distinguished Peer Awards.

‘Take the land’: President Trump wants a border wall. He wants it black. And he wants it by Election Day.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

" President Trump is so eager to complete hundreds of miles of border fence ahead of the 2020 presidential election that he has directed aides to fast-track billions of dollars’ worth of construction contracts, aggressively seize private land and disregard environmental rules, according to current and former officials involved with the project. He also has told worried subordinates that he will pardon them of any potential wrongdoing should they have to break laws to get the barriers built quickly, those officials said. Trump has repeatedly promised to complete 500 miles of fencing by the time voters go to the polls in November 2020, stirring chants of “Finish the Wall!” at his political rallies as he pushes for tighter border controls. But the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has completed just about 60 miles of “replacement” barrier during the first 2½ years of Trump’s presidency, all of it in areas that previously had border infrastructure. [ ‘He always brings them up’: Trump tries to steer border wall deal to North Dakota firm ] The president has told senior aides that a failure to deliver on the signature promise of his 2016 campaign would be a letdown to his supporters and an embarrassing defeat. With the election 14 months away and hundreds of miles of fencing plans still in blueprint form, Trump has held regular White House meetings for progress updates and to hasten the pace, according to several people involved in the discussions. When aides have suggested that some orders are illegal or unworkable, Trump has suggested he would pardon the officials if they would just go ahead, aides said. He has waved off worries about contracting procedures and the use of eminent domain, saying “take the land,” according to officials who attended the meetings. “Don’t worry, I’ll pardon you,” he has told officials in meetings about the wall. “He said people expected him to build a wall, and it had to be done by the election,” one former official said. Asked for comment, a White House official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said Trump is joking when he makes such statements about pardons. Deputy White House press secretary Hogan Gidley said Tuesday that the president is protecting the country with the addition of new border barriers. “Donald Trump promised to secure our border with sane, rational immigration policies to make American communities safer, and that’s happening everywhere the wall is being built,” Gidley said. He called internal criticisms of the president “just more fabrications by people who hate the fact the status quo, that has crippled this country for decades, is finally changing as President Trump is moving quicker than anyone in history to build the wall, secure the border and enact the very immigration policies the American people voted for.” “President Trump is fighting aggressively for the American people where other leaders in the past have rolled over, sold out, and done absolutely nothing,” he said. A U.S. Border Patrol agent stands Aug. 23 in Calexico, Calif., next to a stretch of fence on the U.S.-Mexico border that is to be replaced. As the 2020 election nears, the border is said to be an increasingly urgent concern to the president. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) Materials are positioned in Calexico, Calif., near the U.S. border with Mexico for construction that will will replace old border fencing. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) A section of the border fence that is painted black near downtown Calexico. President Trump wants all new border barriers to be painted black. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper is expected to approve a White House request to divert $3.6 billion in Pentagon funds to the barrier project in coming weeks, money that Trump sought after lawmakers refused to allocate $5 billion. The funds will be pulled from Defense Department projects in 26 states, according to administration officials who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe the matter. [ Trump administration will divert disaster relief funds to U.S.-Mexico border ] Trump’s determination to build the barriers as quickly as possible has not diminished his interest in the aesthetic aspects of the project, particularly the requirement that the looming steel barriers be painted black and topped with sharpened tips. In a meeting at the White House on May 23, Trump ordered the Army Corps and the Department of Homeland Security to paint the structure black, according to internal communications reviewed by The Washington Post. Administration officials have stopped trying to talk him out of the demands, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is preparing to instruct contractors to apply black paint or coating to all new barrier fencing, the communications show. A look at Trump’s border wall prototypes View Graphic A look at Trump’s border wall prototypes Trump conceded last year in an immigration meeting with lawmakers that a wall or barrier is not the most effective mechanism to curb illegal immigration, recognizing it would accomplish less than a major expansion of U.S. enforcement powers and deportation authority. But he told lawmakers that his supporters want a wall and that he has to deliver it. [ This photo shows why a border wall won’t stop the immigration surge ] Trump talked about the loud cheers the wall brought at rallies, according to one person with direct knowledge of the meeting. Former White House chief of staff John F. Kelly would often tell administration officials to disregard the president’s demands if Kelly did not think they were feasible or legally sound, according to current and former aides. Replacement of existing barriers is underway on the U.S. border with Mexico on Aug. 23 near Calexico. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) During a conference call last week, officials at U.S. Customs and Border Protection told Army Corps engineers that the hundreds of miles of fencing must be completed before the next presidential election, according to administration officials with knowledge of the call who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal communications. “Border Patrol insists on compressed acquisition timelines, and we consent. Their goal is to get contracts awarded, not for us to get a quality contract with a thoroughly vetted contractor,” said one senior official who is concerned the agency has been hurried to hand out contracts as quickly as possible. Military officials expect more contract protests because the arrangements have been rushed, the official added. The Army Corps already has had to take corrective actions for two procurement contracts, after companies protested. The companies building the fencing and access roads have been taking heavy earth-moving equipment into environmentally sensitive border areas adjacent to U.S. national parks and wildlife preserves, but the administration has waived procedural safeguards and impact studies, citing national security concerns. “They don’t care how much money is spent, whether landowners’ rights are violated, whether the environment is damaged, the law, the regs or even prudent business practices,” the senior official said. CBP has suggested no longer writing risk-assessment memos “related to the fact that we don’t have real estate rights and how this will impact construction,” the official said. While Trump has insisted that the barriers be painted, the cost of painting them will reduce the length of the fence the government will be able to build. According to the internal analysis, painting or coating 175 miles of barriers “will add between $70 million and $133 million in cost,” trimming the amount of fencing the Army Corps will be able to install by four to seven miles. Sections of barrier being installed on the U.S.-Mexico border near Calexico. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) A section of border barrier that has been painted black near Calexico. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) Razor-fitted concertina wire tops the border barrier in Calexico. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) In June, teams of U.S. soldiers painted a one-mile section of fence in Calexico, Calif., at a cost of $1 million. The coating, known as “matte black” or “flat black,” absorbs heat, making the fence hot to the touch, more slippery and therefore tougher to climb, according to border agents. At Trump’s behest, the Army Corps also is preparing to instruct contractors to remove from the upper part of the fence the smooth metal plates that are used to thwart climbers. The president considered that design feature unsightly, according to officials familiar with his directives. Instead, contractors have been asked to cut the tips of the steel bollards to a sharpened point. Trump had told aides this spring he thought the barrier should be spiked to instill a fear of injury. The change in the bollard design is likely to reduce the overall length of the barrier by two to three miles, according to the administration’s cost assessments. CBP has used a pointed design in the past, according to agency officials, either by installing a pyramid-shaped cap or making what the agency refers to as a “miter cut” in the metal. Trump remains keen to tout incremental progress toward his wall-building commitments, and in recent weeks, top Homeland Security officials have taken to Twitter to promote the advances. People walk on the Tijuana, Mexico, side of the border near the primary fence that separates the United States and Mexico in the San Diego Sector on Aug. 22. (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) In recent days, DHS leaders including acting CBP chief Mark Morgan and the top official at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Ken Cuccinelli, have tweeted photos of border fence construction, echoing promises that 450 miles of new barrier will be completed by next year. Another senior administration official credited both men with injecting urgency, saying that “things are starting to crank away,” even though Cuccinelli’s agency is not involved in the project. Dan Scavino Jr., the White House social media director, has asked for video footage and photos of equipment digging up the desert and planting the barriers so that administration officials can tweet about it, aides said. Administration officials involved in the project also defended the president’s use of eminent domain laws to speed the process. “There is no more constitutionally permissible public purpose for eminent domain than national defense,” said a current administration official who was not authorized to speak on the record about the contracting process. “Our intention is to negotiate with every property owner, and every property owner will receive fair market value for the land,” the official said. “But the land that is needed is not replaceable land. This is not like building a hospital or even a school. There is no alternative land to the border.” CBP and Pentagon officials insist they remain on track to complete about 450 miles of fencing by the election. Of that, about 110 miles will be added to areas where there is currently no barrier. The height of the structure will vary between 18 and 30 feet, high enough to inflict severe injury or death from a fall. The Border Patrol’s strategic planning and analysis office has not made a final decision on the black paint or other White House design requests. “Ultimately, we’ll do our assessment and determine what is the best for us operationally,” said Brian Martin, the office’s chief, adding that the agency is waiting to get border agents’ feedback on whether the coating would be beneficial. Martin also said CBP would continue to install anti-climb panels on portions of the barrier already under contract, calling the design “very vital to overall effectiveness.” But he and other CBP officials said that some new portions of barriers will have the panels and that others will not, a determination that he said will be guided by necessity, not aesthetics. Trump has recently urged the Army Corps to award a contract to a company he favors, North Dakota-based Fisher Industries, though the firm has not been selected. Fisher has been aggressively pushed by Trump ally Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.), who briefly held up the confirmation of a Trump budget office nominee last month in an attempt to put pressure on the Army Corps. Cramer demanded to see the contracts awarded to Fisher’s competitors, lashing out at the “arrogance” of the Army Corps in emails to military officials after he was told the bidding process involved proprietary information that could not be shared. The CEO of Fisher Industries is a major backer of Cramer and has donated to his campaigns. [ These photos show private border barriers being built on private land ] Cramer visited the El Paso area Tuesday to tour border facilities and view a span of privately funded border fencing Fisher built as a showcase for what it claims are superior construction techniques. Cramer posted videos of his tour to social media. He undertook the tour “to see the crisis at our border firsthand.” The senator had asked Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite, the commander of the Army Corps, to meet him at the site, but Semonite is traveling in Brazil, where the Trump administration has offered to help fight wildfires in the Amazon. In an email to The Post, Cramer said he met with CEO Tommy Fisher on Tuesday at a span of fencing the company built on private land; he said Army Corps officials joined them at the site. “The agents on the ground said the walls have been very helpful in slowing illegal crossings,” Cramer wrote. “I’m not a wall-building expert, but at the pace of the last few years, it’s hard to see how 450 miles gets built with the same process.?.?. I wish DHS would engage a whole bunch of builders and innovators rather than rely on the same decades old bureaucracy.” Cramer said he shared the president’s “frustration” with the pace of progress. Several administration officials who confirmed the White House’s urgency said they expect to be able to deliver on Trump’s demands because the actual construction of the barriers is typically the last step in the process. “There is a long lead time to acquiring land, getting permits and identifying funding,” the official said. “I think you will see a dramatic increase in wall construction next year because all of the work over the past two years has primed the pump.” A construction site for a secondary border fence follows the length of the primary border fence that separates the United States and Mexico in the San Diego Sector on Aug. 22, in San Diego (Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post) ‘Take the land’: President Trump wants a border wall. He wants it black. And he wants it by Election Day.

Opinion | Mazel Tov, Trump. You’ve Revived the Jewish Left. - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

By Michelle Goldberg nytimes.com ‘Only one political party is quite literally inciting white nationalists to shoot up our synagogues.’ Opinion Columnist Jewish groups protesting immigrant detention policies in Los Angeles this month. On Aug.

Opinion | Defenders of a Racist President Use Jews as Human Shields - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Trump’s bigoted attack on four congresswomen of color has nothing to do with fighting anti-Semitism. Opinion Columnist Sebastian Gorka at the White House last week.

Hong Kong Officer Fires Shot, and Police Use Water Cannons at Protest - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

By Raymond Zhong Austin Ramzy nytimes.com Police officers aimed guns at protestors in the Tsuen Wan district of Hong Kong on Sunday. The confrontations followed a peaceful march by more than 10,000 people.

China 52

The unraveling of a Presidency

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

52

The US won't vaccinate migrant children against flu at border camps

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

" The U.S. won't be vaccinating migrant families in holding centers ahead of this year's flu season, despite calls from doctors to boost efforts to fight the infection that's killed at least three children at detention facilities in the past year. "In

NBC 52

Rashida Tlaib on Trump v the Squad: 'He's scared of us' | US news | The Guardian

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

" In the days after Donald Trump derailed Rashida Tlaib’s plans to visit Israel and the Palestinian territories , the president taunted and repeatedly attacked the Michigan Democrat, calling her obnoxious, violent and crazy.

Tax 52

The U.S. Deported a Million of Its Own Citizens to Mexico During the Great Depression - HISTORY

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

“Up to 1.8 million people of Mexican descent—most of them American-born—were rounded up in informal raids and deported in an effort to reserve jobs for white people. In the 1930s, the Los Angeles Welfare Department decided to start deporting hospital patients of Mexican descent.

History's Biggest Mass Deportations and What the Consequences Were

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"The looming threat of Trump deportations are a worry for many inhabitants of the United States in 2017. The Orange President vowed to deport two to three million undocumented immigrants within the first few days of being elected.

In Hong Kong Protest, Tear Gas and Violence Return After Period of Calm - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

" "HONG KONG — Violence returned to the streets of Hong Kon Chin Chia g on Saturday, as the police fired tear gas at protesters and demonstrators threw stones and gasoline bombs at officers, signaling the end of a period of relative calm in the city.

China 52

Opinion | Four People of Color Were Freed From Death Row. Republicans Put Them Back. - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

" The North Carolina Supreme Court will hear a case next week that’s a matter of life or death for some inmates. The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

Opinion | Japan, South Korea and a Rupture on the Pacific Rim - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"The United States could help resolve the rift between two critical allies. But it has shown little interest. The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

RIM 52

Opinion | A Lust for Punishment - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"President Trump continues to inflict pain on minorities in this country because it supports the white supremacist patriarchy.

Chris Hayes examines the ubiquity of anti-semitism in America

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Chris Hayes examines the ubiquity of anti-semitism in America

40

U.S. Ends Protection for Migrants Receiving Medical Care | Time

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Ends Protection for Migrants Receiving Medical Care | Time

40

U.S. Ends Protection for Migrants Receiving Medical Care | Time

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Ends Protection for Migrants Receiving Medical Care | Time

40

The US won't vaccinate migrant children against flu at border camps

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

" The U.S. won't be vaccinating migrant families in holding centers ahead of this year's flu season, despite calls from doctors to boost efforts to fight the infection that's killed at least three children at detention facilities in the past year. "In

NBC 40