Sat.Apr 13, 2019 - Fri.Apr 19, 2019

Why Artists Should Care About @AGSNYT: How The Times Thinks About Privacy

Music Technology Policy

The New York Times has started “The Privacy Project” and kicks off the story correctly with an introspective opinion piece from the boss, A.G. Sulzberger. We should do the same.

Wilson on Brandenburg in an Era of Populism @richardawilson7

Media Law Prof Blog

Richard Ashby Wilson, University of Connecticut School of Law, is publishing Brandenburg in An Era of Populism: Risk Analysis in the First Amendment in the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law & Public Affairs (2019). Here is the abstract.

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The Perfect Podcast for Mueller-Report Release Day: ‘Talking Feds’

Media Law

With the report due out today of the investigation by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III into Russian election interference, there is one podcast I will be watching for its next episode to come out.

We Must Impeach Trump!

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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FCC Releases Notices on Radio License Renewal Process – New Form, New Database and More Scrutiny of the Public File

Broadcast Law Blog

The FCC yesterday released two public notices about the procedures to be used in the upcoming radio license renewal cycle. These actions were previewed by the FCC at the NAB Convention last week (see our article here ).

Travis on The "Monster" That Ate Social Networking? @fiulaw

Media Law Prof Blog

Hannibal Travis, Florida International University College of Law, has published The ‘Monster’ That Ate Social Networking? in Cyberspace Law: Censorship and Regulation of the Internet (Travis ed., Routledge 2013). Here is the abstract. This chapter analyzes the privacy, intellectual property

LawNext Episode 35: Felicity Conrad, Cofounder and CEO of Paladin

Media Law

Felicity Conrad is on a mission to help expand pro bono legal services. The legal technology company she cofounded, Paladin , helps corporations, law firms, law schools and legal service organizations streamline their pro bono programs, with the greater goal of helping them serve more clients in need and help close the gap in access to justice.

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Bloomberg Law Says It Has ‘Significantly’ Expanded its Litigation Analytics

Media Law

Bloomberg Law says it has today rolled out a significant expansion of its Litigation Analytics suite, now providing analytics on over 100,000 attorneys from over 775 law firms, in addition to analytics on over 7,000 law firms, 70,000 public companies, 3.5 million private companies, and all federal judges.

Trump did conspire with Russians. Mueller expects Congress to impeach Trump. Attorney General Barr lied in his letter.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

What the Mueller report says about that 'compromising tape'

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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Trump on Mueller's appointment: I'm F ed

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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James Clapper: Mueller report is devastating

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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#ImpeachTrump Nancy Pelosi get behind Impeachment proceedings or step aside so we can get a real leader in the House of Representatives who is willing to do their Constitution mandated job.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Mueller report examines '10 episodes' of potential obstruction by Trump | US news | The Guardian

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Mueller report examines '10 episodes' of potential obstruction by Trump | US news | The Guardian

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Ramy Youssef: I Wish Muslims Prayed On Sundays

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Slams New York Post Cover Attacking Rep. Ilhan.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Booker says Ilhan Omar "does not deserve these. hate-filled attacks"

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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Democrats Are Failing To Defend Ilhan Omar!

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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Donald Trump Isn’t Playing Games With Ilhan Omar—He’s Inciting Violence

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"The most fair reading of President Donald Trump’s persistent attacks on Congresswoman Ilhan Omar is that the President has entered the Henry II phase of his tyranny.

Games 52

Anderson Cooper: If Trump's not worried, why is he tweeting?

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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The Dangerous Bullying of Ilhan Omar | The New Yorker

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"You know how bullying works. The victim is marked long before the bullying begins: it’s the kid no one really likes, the weirdo who is barely tolerated by the larger group. The defenseless, isolated kid. And when the bullying starts to happen, the rest of the children look the other way.

In Attacking Ilhan Omar, Trump Revives His Familiar Refrain Against Muslims - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, has emerged as a foil for President Trump before the 2020 election.Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA, via Shutterstock Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, has emerged as a foil for President Trump before the 2020 election. As long as President Trump has focused on what he said was the danger lurking at the southwestern border, he has also talked about the supposed threat from one specific group already in the country: Muslims. During the 2016 campaign, he would not rule out creating a registry of Muslims in the United States. He claimed to have seen “thousands” of Muslims cheering on rooftops in New Jersey after Sept. 11, a statement that was widely debunked. After deadly attacks in Paris and California, Mr. Trump called for a moratorium on Muslims traveling to the United States. “I think Islam hates us,” Mr. Trump told Anderson Cooper, the CNN host, in March 2016. Now, with 19 months until the 2020 election, Mr. Trump is seeking to rally his base by sounding that theme once again. And this time, he has a specific target: Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Mr. Trump and his team are trying to make Ms. Omar, one of a group of progressive women Democratic House members who is relatively unknown in national politics, a household name, to be seen as the most prominent voice of the Democratic Party, regardless of her actual position. And they are gambling that there will be limited downside in doing so. On Monday, Mr. Trump will visit Minnesota — a state that some of the president’s aides speak of as a place to expand his electoral map — and will hold an economic round table. The event is outside Ms. Omar’s congressional district, but the president’s decision to appear there is a calculated choice. His Minnesota appearance comes after his tweet of a video interspersed with Ms. Omar speaking and the burning World Trade Center towers. Ms. Omar’s critics have claimed a portion of the remarks, in which she highlighted Islamophobia faced by Muslims after Sept. 11, were dismissive of the terrorist attacks. Mr. Trump is banking on painting the entire Democratic Party as extreme. And Ms. Omar has become a point of contention for some members of her own party, after remarks she made about the Israel lobby were condemned as anti-Semitic by some long-serving Democrats, as well as by Republicans and Mr. Trump. But Mr. Trump’s electoral success in 2016 was based partly on culture wars and fears among an older, white voting base that the country it knew was slipping away. Like his hard line on immigration, his plays on fears of Muslims — including inaccurately conflating them with terrorists — proved polarizing among the wider electorate, but helped him keep a tight grip on his most enthusiastic voters. In the South Carolina Republican primary in February 2016, for instance, exit polls showed that 75 percent of voters favored his proposed Muslim ban. Now, as he looks toward 2020, he is betting that electoral play can deliver for him again. It is a strategy that risks summoning dark forces in American society, a point Ms. Omar made in a statement Sunday evening. “Since the president’s tweet Friday evening, I have experienced an increase in direct threats on my life — many directly referencing or replying to the president’s video,” Ms. Omar said. “This is endangering lives. It has to stop.” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Sunday that she had requested a review of Ms. Omar’s security, while Trump aides insisted that the president meant no harm. Mr. Trump, who once said, “Islam hates us,” tweeted a video on Friday that interspersed remarks made by Ms. Omar with graphic images of Sept. 11.Tom Brenner for The New York Times Mr. Trump, who once said, “Islam hates us,” tweeted a video on Friday that interspersed remarks made by Ms. Omar with graphic images of Sept. 11. “Certainly the president is wishing no ill will and certainly not violence towards anyone,” Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said on Sunday’s broadcast of ABC News’ “This Week.” Privately, Mr. Trump’s advisers describe Ms. Omar as his ideal foil. Her remarks about the power of the pro-Israel lobby in the United States, combined with her role in a progressive contingent of freshman House Democrats who have sparked intraparty battles, have been treated as a gift by Republicans. Trump aides and allies say they are pleased that some of the Democratic hopefuls for the 2020 presidential nomination are defending her against the president’s attacks, claiming they think it will be damaging for them in the general election. Ms. Omar “is the perfect embodiment of the sharp contrast President Trump wants to paint for 2020,” said Sam Nunberg, a 2016 campaign aide to Mr. Trump. He added that Mr. Trump is tethering Ms. Omar to more visible Democrats, like her closest ally in Congress, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, whom Republicans have sought to make a boogeyman. “This contrast gives the president a chance to expand his support closer to 50 percent,” Mr. Nunberg insisted. But on Sunday, Democrats said Mr. Trump was diving into an issue on which he has a shaky standing. “He has no moral authority to be talking about 9/11 at all,” Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York, said on CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday. Mr. Nadler noted that Mr. Trump’s real estate company applied for and received grants after the attacks that were intended for small businesses affected by the devastation. Mr. Nadler said he thought Ms. Omar’s comments about the Sept. 11 attacks were being taken out of context. “I have had some problems with some of her other remarks, but not with that one,” Mr. Nadler said. The controversy arose from Ms. Omar’s remarks at an event last month sponsored by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, an advocacy organization, where she focused on attacks against Muslims after Sept. 11. She said she had “lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it.” “CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties,” she said. (The organization was actually founded in 1994.) Critics of Ms. Omar contended that the words “some people did something” were dismissive of the terrorist attacks, but her defenders said her words were taken out of context. The attack was not Mr. Trump’s first on Ms. Omar. Despite repeatedly being denounced for not making forceful condemnations of white nationalists who traffic in anti-Semitism, the president pounced when Ms. Omar unleashed a firestorm in February with her comments on Israel, rejecting her subsequent apology and calling for her to resign. “Congressman Omar is terrible, what she said,” Mr. Trump told reporters. Geoff Garin, a veteran Democratic strategist, said the Democratic presidential candidates who had responded to Mr. Trump’s latest attacks on Ms. Omar were keeping the focus on his tactics. And he predicted that the use of such graphic images from one of the nation’s darkest days would backfire for the president. “Voters are turned off by the use of 9/11 for political purposes, and my guess is that moderate voters are going to see Trump’s use of that as both ugly and extreme,” Mr. Garin said. “I think his over-the-top exploitation of 9/11 is going to turn more voters off than he wins over by attacking the Democrats on this.” In Attacking Ilhan Omar, Trump Revives His Familiar Refrain Against Muslims - The New York Times

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Opinion | Demonizing Minority Women - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"By Charles M. Blow April 14th, 2019 Representative Ilhan Omar is the latest target in a trend of conservatives attacking women of color. Representative Ilhan Omar. White supremacy has routinely painted minority women as pathological and reprobate.

Rep. Ilhan Omar Says Death Threats Have Increased Since Trump's Attack | HuffPost

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Ilhan Omar Says Death Threats Have Increased Since Trump's Attack | HuffPost

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Full Extended Interview With Rep. Ilhan Omar

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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Ilhan Omar Is Right The Lies Must Stop!

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Trump Assails Ilhan Omar With Video of Sept. 11 Attacks - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"President Trump on Friday targeted Representative Ilhan Omar for remarks she made during a speech on civil rights and Muslims in America with a graphic video featuring the burning World Trade Center towers and other images from Sept. 11, 2001, that he tweeted to millions of his followers.

They LIED To You About AFRICA

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

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Friday Roundup: Experiential Learning, Legal Outcomes, Legal Ethics, and More

Media Law

A roundup of the week’s news from the worlds of legal technology and innovation: Albany Law program will prepare students for high-tech careers.

Special counsel's report says investigators struggled with whether Trump committed crime of obstruction - The Washington Post

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"By Devlin Barrett, www.washingtonpost.comView OriginalApril 18th, 2019 The report from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III lays out in alarming detail abundant evidence against President Trump, finding 10 “episodes” of potential obstruction of justice but ultimately concluding it was not Mueller’s role to determine whether the commander in chief broke the law.

I Have 10 Free Tickets to Global Legal Hackathon Gala May 4 in NYC

Media Law

Thanks to the generosity of Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory , I have 10 free admission tickets to give away for the final round gala of the Global Legal Hackathon. If purchased, a ticket would cost $75. The semi-formal gala is Saturday, May 4, at White & Case in midtown New York City, with a demo hall and cocktail hour beginning at 5 p.m. and the program starting at 5:30 p.m.

Mueller Report Is Released: Live Updates - The New York Times

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

"The Justice Department has released a redacted version of the report by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, who investigated Russian election interference, any ties to the Trump campaign and possible presidential obstruction. By Peter Baker Updated 6 minutes ago Right Now The report has been released publicly. Our reporters are reading it and will post major findings and analysis soon.

Mueller report shows President Trump tried to remove Special Counsel

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Mueller report shows President Trump tried to remove Special Counsel

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Trump: No regrets about Rep. Ilhan Omar death threats. This is outrageous and the lack of support for representative Omar shows how bigoted America remains. It is sickening.

Communications And Entertainment Law Blog

Trump: No regrets about Rep. Ilhan Omar death threats

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